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Ireland

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Magee 1866 are proud to champion sustainability as a fundamental part of our ethos which has evolved over the last 150 years. Our Magee Weaving Mill pre-dominantly uses natural fibres like wool and linen, which are biodegradable, renewable and the high-quality fabric is then manufactured locally. Quality is our principle product value and is evident from our fabric to finished garment. Magee Clothing’s design philosophy promotes the sustainable concept of ‘slow fashion’ through timeless and classic collections. Sustainable fabric and high quality, long lasting products define our brand DNA. We are currently in the process of understanding which of the various environmental and sustainability certificates best align with this company ethos. 

Donegal bay

It is a 5th generation family business and the Temple family behind Magee 1866 are committed to manufacturing in the most sustainable and environmentally friendly way possible. The Temple family have planted over 150 acres of forestry to off-set carbon emissions, grow their own organic vegetables & breed a small herd of their own organic grass-fed cattle. 

Raw Materials

We focus on weaving and producing garments using ‘Noble Natural Fibres’:

  • Wool: biodegradable & renewable. It is sourced by our trusted spinning partners within the E.U. Countries of origin include: Ireland, Norway, Peru, Australia, New Zealand. We are working on specific projects with complete traceability of wool to the farm source. A collection using Irish Wool will launch in AW 2020.  
  • Linen: biodegradable & renewable. Our Irish Linen is grown in Northern France, spun in Poland and designed, woven & finished in Donegal. Linen also uses considerably less water than cotton and grows on poor land. 
  • We also work with alpaca, cashmere, mohair and silk. All are biodegradable & renewable. 
  • We do on occasion use a small % of man-made fibres in our fabrics in order to enhance performance (e.g. stretch, added design).

Manufacturing 

  • All fabric is tested by third parties ICQ and Intertech to industry standards. 
  • Warping, weaving, and finishing of fabric is done in house, allowing for complete control and high standards ensured at all times. 
  • Within Magee Weaving, synthetic dyes are used to cater for a large colour palette. Reactive and acid dyes used on our fibres comply with EU standards.  Please note that natural dye alternatives require heavy metals to adhere to the fibre, which can be as harmful to the environment. We conclude that natural dyes are not necessarily a better alternative. 
  • Mild detergents are used, similar to those of domestic washing machine concentrations. 
  • Cardboard waste is re-cycled. We are researching recycled fibre merchants. 

Spring summer 2020, a focus on natural linens, wool and cashmere.

Energy

  • Magee 1866 purchases electricity from a Green energy provider (i.e. Hydro or wind), currently coming from the mainstream grid. 
  • Oil is used to generate heat in the absence of any other alternatives in our geographical region e.g. there is no natural gas pipe line Co. Donegal. Alternatives to fossil fuels are being urgently sought, costed and plans drawn to invest in solar power within the next 3 years. 
  • Local water is used in our production of cloth. Due to the fact that Donegal has a high volume and frequency of rainfall, (1600mm p.a.), this resource is not under pressure from a shortage.

If you’re looking for an excuse to travel Ireland’s beautiful coast and landscapes, St. Patrick’s Day offers the perfect opportunity. With a bank holiday on Tuesday, it might be time to give yourself a four-day weekend and explore the best of Ireland’s scenic and cultural offerings.

The Giant’s Causeway

Incredibly picturesque and rich in Irish mythology and legend, there’s a reason you’ll see the Giant’s Causeway on nearly every travel list. Interlocking basalt columns give the shoreline a striking graphic look, the result of an ancient volcanic eruption. Children will love jumping from column to column at low tide, and there are plenty of photo opportunities. Be sure to read about the legends surrounding the area or, better yet, get a tour guide! Find out more.

Other attractions in the area include the Carrick-a Rede rope bridge which takes you over the ocean, from mainland to the tiny island of Carrickarede. A coastal drive along the Antrim’s cliff-lined coast is always recommended, too.

The Guinness Storehouse

Is there anything more Irish than a pint of the black stuff on St. Patrick’s Day?! Head down to Dublin for St. Patrick’s Day weekend, where the celebrations will be in full swing. The Guinness Storehouse is the perfect place to kick off the weekend, learning about the history and craft Ireland’s best-loved and iconic stout beer. Your experience culminates with a drink in the famous Gravity Bar, with panoramic views of Dublin City. Find out more.

Slieve League Cliffs in Donegal

If you’d prefer to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with something a bit more wild, head up the coast to Europe’s highest sea cliffs in Donegal. There are several walking routes with stunning views of the Atlantic Ocean and plenty of fresh sea air. Find out more.

Following your walk pop into the Rusty Mackerel Pub in Carrick for some lunch and a well earned drink. And of course we always recommend a visit to Donegal Town, and our original Magee shop on the Diamond!

Galway City

As the European Capital of Culture for 2020, now is the perfect time to visit medieval Galway City. Bursting with colour and music, Galway will be full of exciting cultural events for St. Patrick’s Day weekend. Take a stroll through winding medieval streets or walk along the famous Salthill Prom, before checking out the full ream of theatre, dance, music, arts and more that Galway offers every weekend! Find out more.

The Dingle Peninsula

Head down to Kerry for 47 kilometres of scenic driving. You’ll pass beaches, views of the famous Skelling Michael, and Stone Age ringforts which all offer great opportunities for getting out of the car and exploring a bit. Dingle Town, itself has plenty of charm, with cosy pubs and unique shops to check out of an afternoon. Be sure to have a seafood dinner while in Dingle, as it’s a harbour town and has some of the freshest daily catches you’ll find! Find out more.

Whether you’re coming home for the holidays or taking advantage of the time off with a bit of traveling, County Donegal is a beautiful place to visit in the winter months. Think brilliant sunrises over frosty hills, fresh wild air along the coastline, and a uniquely festive atmosphere that makes for perfect cosy nights with friends and family. Here are our top tips for enjoying a winter weekend in Donegal!

Enjoy a festive afternoon in Donegal Town

Around the holidays, Donegal Town is full of the holiday spirit with decorations, caroling groups in the Diamond, shopping, and lots of opportunities to sit down for a cuppa and a mince pie. There’s always the Weaver’s Loft Restaurant above the Magee 1866 store, where you’ll find home-baked scones, pies and treats as well as a full lunch menu with daily specials. Round off the day with a stroll down by the scenic Donegal harbour.

Photo via Facebook @DonegalOnline

Go for a long walk on the beach or a hike

Is there anything more invigorating than a winter beach walk? Donegal has plenty to offer in the way of beach strolls. Heading north, you have the option of Rossnowlagh, Murvagh Beach, and Mountcharles Pier. If you’re feeling really brave, join the locals for a polar plunge on Christmas Day. And then of course you can head west toward Sliabh Liag for stunning views as you walk along Ireland’s highest sea cliffs. If you’re up for an adventure, take to the wild of the Bluestack Mountains on our doorstep.

Have a Sunday lunch with friends & family

Donegal has some lovely destination spots for a meal or afternoon tea with loved ones. From Harvey’s Point on the shores of Lough Eske, to the Lough Eske Castle Hotel, to the House Gastro Pub in Donegal Town, there are plenty of places to whet the appetite and spend some quality time together over great food.

Enjoy a pint and some music

Donegal is full of cosy pubs, and you can usually find some music to enjoy, too. McCafferty’s in Donegal Town is always a great choice for a pint or two, with music and a lively atmosphere. Down the road in Ardara, Nancy’s Seafood Bar is a lovely warm spot for a quiet pint and some food.

Flax

Ireland has always been known for its linen, during the Victorian era Northern Ireland was the largest producer of linen worldwide. Today there are just a few mills left in Ireland weaving this very special and I think, underrated fabric. Many have fallen out of love with linen due to its tendency to crease badly – I feel this is part of its unique character and a well tailored, high quality linen garment – creased or not will still look well!

Our own mill design and weave linen namely for tailored garments – suits and blazers and there are a handful of other mills across Northern Ireland producing for shirts and home interiors.

To celebrate this sustainable and natural cloth we have just launched a capsule Made in Ireland – Woven in Ireland shirt collection for men.

The Grandfather shirt – made in Ireland from start to finish.

There are three styles across four classic colours – oat, white, sky blue and navy. We have used a timeless hopsack linen from Baird McNutt, who are designing in Donegal and weaving in County Antrim.

Linen is made from the fibres of the flax plant, it is one of the oldest fabrics in the world and known for its cool, fresh properties. It is lightweight, made from natural fibres and a sustainable material. These beautifully tailored shirts are truly investment pieces designed and made to last.

Shop our Irish Linen Shirt Collection.

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